Screw Donald Trump: There will be art [Guest Post]

“There is an ever-present role for art in the era of increasing tyranny, fear, and irrational untruths, spearheaded by Donald Trump.”

#DonaldTrump #Art #Artists

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Today, I’ll share with you a post that I wrote for my other blog, TimothyHucks.com!

It is about the ever-present role for art in the era of increasing tyranny, fear, and irrational untruths, spearheaded by Donald Trump. I hope you enjoy the piece and remember that the need for an artist’s voice does not diminish with adversity – it only increases.

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Trump doesn’t want you to know nobody likes him. [Video]

“Although Donald Trump’s ego causes him to pick the most minuscule fights about everything from ratings to crowd sizes to his face on the cover of Time Magazine, I would argue he’s doing it for a reason. His big secret? Nobody likes him.”

#DonaldTrump

Although Donald Trump’s ego causes him to pick the most minuscule fights about everything from ratings to crowd sizes to his face on the cover of Time Magazine, I would argue he’s doing it for a reason. His big secret? Nobody likes him.

Let me explain:

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Entertainment has always been political

“But whether it’s Clint Eastwood talking to an empty chair at the RNC, or Chuck Norris, or Mike Rowe, or Vince Vaughn, or James Woods, or Donald Trump, a reality TV star turned president – conservatives do not seem to have a problem with celebrities raising their voice to join the politic of America when that voice is conservative.”

#conservatives #Trump #Entertainment

If I were to put things as charitably as possible at the moment, I would say that conservatives have elected someone for president that….people dislike more than usual. The list of people he has pissed off spans indigenous people, conservatives, liberals, intelligence officers, Muslims, immigrants, the disabled, black people, Jewish people, women, probably a couple of animals, and definitely Lin Manuel-Miranda, creator of the groundbreaking musical Hamilton. 

That tweet is especially striking if you know anything about the persona of Lin, and if you know that it’s certainly not built around condemning others to damnation (something must have really gotten under his skin.)

Trump supporters have taken to vigorously calling out liberal late-night hosts for their incessant critiques on Trump. I suppose I can see why (they’re more critical than usual), but also I can’t empathize (have you seen how easy this guy makes it?) Asking people who make jokes for a living to not riff on a guy who literally stares directly at an eclipse without ocular protection is just cruel.

Also, I would remind conservatives on the Trump train that entertainment has a deep, long history of being political. Charlie Chaplin delivered one of the best film speeches of all time as a parodied Adolf Hitler in “The Great Dictator”:

“We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost…”

Often people like John Legend, Lin-Manuel Miranda, or Colin Kaepernick will be told to “stay in their lane” or “stick to entertaining” when they voice an opinion critical of the president.

But whether it’s Clint Eastwood talking to an empty chair at the RNC, or Chuck Norris, or Mike Rowe, or Vince Vaughn, or James Woods, or Donald Trump, a reality TV star turned president – conservatives do not seem to have a problem with celebrities raising their voice to join the politic of America when that voice is conservative. Entertainment has always been political.

My advice? Toughen up, snowflakes. This president in particular makes it extremely easy to make fun of him, and as Aragog from Harry Potter says:

“I cannot deny them fresh meat when it wanders so willingly into our midst.”

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The brutal indifference of tolerance

“Any bonds of humanity, citizenship, or love that he is referring to in this speech, he clearly does not believe in.”

#Trump #LasVegas #Shooting

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald Trump made it very clear that he doesn’t care about words. So much so that CNN Host Fareed Zakaria said this about him on fellow anchor Don Lemon’s show:

“I think the president is somewhat indifferent to things that are true or false. He has spent his whole life bullshitting. He has succeeded by bullshitting. He has gotten the presidency by bullshitting. It’s very hard to tell someone at that point that bullshit doesn’t work, because…look at the results.”

The media already knows this about Donald Trump. The New York Times reported that Donald Trump told the public lies every day for his first 40 days in office. And it is with that context that I present to you his comments after a domestic terrorist opened fire on 50+ concert goers last night in Las Vegas, outpacing the Orlando Pulse Nightclub massacre for “deadliest mass shooting since 1949.

“It was an act of pure evil. In moments of tragedy and pure horror, America comes together as one, and it always has. We call upon the bonds that unite us: our faith, our family, and our shared values. We call upon the bonds of citizenship, the ties of community, and the comfort of our common humanity. Our unity cannot be shattered by evil, our bonds cannot be broken by violence, and though we feel such great anger at the senseless murder of our fellow citizens, it is our love that defines us today, and always will.”

On a normal day, the media is doing its job. It’s slamming Sean Spicer or Sarah Huckabee Sanders for outright lying to the American public without a hint of remorse. It’s literally guiding the president through the intricacies of institutions he has no hope of understanding. But they regularly lose their footing with tolerance.

In the absence of context, these words seem fine. They seem like a call for unity, peace, and love. However, they only work if we forget everything we know about the person saying them.

How can a man who, days ago, attacked a mayor grieving for the people of Puerto Rico as having “poor leadership” be fit to call for unity?

How can a man who yesterday again actively discouraged American citizens from exercising their constitutional rights at a football game ask for peace?

How can a man who insisted, in the wake of white supremacists running multiple people over with a car, that “Eh, there was violence on both sides” call to our common bonds of humanity?

“What do you know of love? Who have you ever loved?” – The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Tweeting a GIF of hitting Secretary Clinton with a golfball? Banning transgender troops from the military? Rescinding the DACA program to deport children brought here illegally? Suggesting that Second Amendment supporters murder Secretary Clinton? Inciting violence at his rallies? Running an entire campaign based on the preservation of the supremacy of the white race? Do any of these ring a bell?

Any bonds of humanity, citizenship, or love that he is referring to in this speech, he clearly does not believe in.

He lies to the media because he knows they’ll believe it, desperate to retain the sense that all hope is not lost, and that there may lie a person capable of the smallest amount of introspection or goodness underneath the horrific mask. (Remember Van Jones drooling over him because he spoke full sentences once?)

But it’s not a mask.

And Donald Trump twists, bends, and shatters even the idea of the truth because he preys on the left’s insistence on tolerance. He preys on the fact that most liberals are committed to “having dialogues” and “reaching outside their echo chambers” and “listening to the other side” which he is wholly unwilling to engage in, and he knows it. He knows that they’re afraid to outright say that he’s wrong and that they’re right.

Pretending that there is some other Donald Trump lurking in the shadows of his ghostly heart represents a brutal and craven indifference to fact, or the communities harmed by his actions, and to portray him as just another viewpoint is the height of irresponsibility.

We should not exalt him for paltry and easy words that he neither means nor exemplifies. And we certainly shouldn’t praise him for hollow words with no commitment to do anything about the violence he decries.

He has no courage or empathy, he has neither sacrificed nor given anything, and he cares not for anyone but himself.

Donald Trump is not a leader, and it’s long time that liberals knew they have no responsibility to call him one or pretend he can be.

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“All God’s children are terrible”: Why the heartland of America is white

“Why do we know so much about the motives of Trump voters? Because we ask them. Despite the fact that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by almost 3 million votes, rarely will you find profiles that say, “We went deep into the heart of Clinton country – here’s what we found.”

“All God’s children are terrible.” – Liz Lemon, 30 Rock

Days after the 2016 election, Senator Bernie Sanders released an op-ed in the New York Times, exhorting a grieving and tense America to empathize with rural white voters.

Senator Sanders has spent a lot of time on this idea. It is, in many ways, the soul of his campaigning style. The pitch boils down to, “In electing Trump, the white people did what they had to do. Squeezed to the point of desperation, and ignored by elite, establishment Democrats, they turned to what seemed a solution for their problems.”

With respect to the senator, there’s one problem: It’s not true.

Nicholas Carnes and Noam Lupu of the Washington Post released an article in June entitled, “It’s time to bust the myth: Most Trump voters were not working class,” in which they detail the incomes of people who voted for Donald Trump.

“To the contrary, many polls showed that Trump supporters were mostly affluent Republicans. For example, a March 2016 NBC survey that we analyzed showed that only a third of Trump supporters had household incomes at or below the national median of about $50,000. Another third made $50,000 to $100,000, and another third made $100,000 or more and that was true even when we limited the analysis to only non-Hispanic whites.”

According to another WaPo story, the American National Election Study, a publicly funded data source, has been conducted since 1948, “at first through in-person surveys, and now also online, with about 1,200 nationally representative respondents answering some questions for about 80 minutes.”

Tom Wood, an assistant professor of political science at Ohio State Universitysaid of the ANES data:

“Since 1988, we’ve never seen such a clear correspondence between vote choice and racial perceptions.”

Sanders’ insistence that America shift its attention to the idiosyncrasies of white voters is misplaced, but, even despite the evidence, widely shared.

Article after article, before and after the election, pushed the undying narrative of the poor, working class, white voter, struggling to get ahead or just get by, and it’s for one simple reason: The American heartland is white.

Stone Mountain

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Season 4, episode 3 of the hit comedy 30 Rock features Jack Donaghy (a caricatured Republican) and Liz Lemon (a caricatured Democrat) going on a search for new talent for their sketch comedy show. Jack feels that the show represents an out-of-touch ethos, and endeavors to convince Lemon of the simple goodness of the people from “real America.”

This sentiment is echoed every time a liberal journalist heads to down South and says, “We went deep into Trump country, here’s what we found.”

In it is the tacit admission that they believe that America is best represented by white people. Between the rigid and sometimes unapologetically racist ideological enclaves of America, and the failure of liberals to eschew pluralism when on righteous ground, the standard definition of America has been hijacked to mean “white farmers.”

In the end, Jack ends up broken when he realizes that that virtue of “all-American” people doesn’t exist. He doesn’t realize that they have no more goodness in them than the rest of us, and that it’s time to stop exalting the image of rural white people above all.  That it’s wrong to say that they represent a more actual picture of America than anyone else.

The heartland of America is white

Why do we know so much about the motives of Trump voters? Because we ask them. Despite the fact that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by almost 3 million votes, rarely will you find profiles that say, “We went deep into the heart of Clinton country – here’s what we found.”

Is America not represented by those voters? By black people? Is it not represented by a 28 year old Muslim graphic designer in New York City? Is it not represented by a Puerto Rican mother in Georgia?

It must say something about the American public that we are willing to spend infinitely more resources humanizing the indefensible than protecting the vulnerable. (See: the president’s recent beef with black athletes vs. his defense of Nazis.)

“I think that the Constitution should be used less as a shield for the guilty, and more as a sword for their innocent victims.” – Jack McCoy, Law and Order

The Forgotten

men-in-denim-built-our-country-men-in-suits-have-20639964
Memes like this reflect the worship of manual labor, rabid anti-intellectualism, and mistrust of education present in many rural communities.

It must say something about the American public that we are willing go along with the lie that manual labor is the only labor worth valuing, that education is a thing to be feared, and that white people are what America means – and that we let white people themselves set that tone for us.

Tomi Lahren, former commentator for the conservative outlet The Blaze, states that she gives conservative America a voice because they feel forgotten, and that the “flyover states” feel powerless in the landscape of American politics. Do we so easily take cues from Tangerine Lemonade?

It must also say something about us that this focus on white voters amounts to the same kind of explanations that we deny for people who are not. Rapper Eminem, in his song, “The Way I Am” notes this:

“When a dude’s getting bullied and shoots up his school
And they blame it on Marilyn (on Marilyn)… and the heroin
Where were the parents at? And look where it’s at
Middle America, now it’s a tragedy
Now it’s so sad to see, an upper class city
Having this happening (this happening)…”

This hand-wringing highlights that the flagship identity of America is white, and the concern that it garners when compared to other communities is laughable. Both Secretary Clinton and Governor Chris Christie have noted that we must treat drug addicts as patients rather than criminals. However, some, including former Attorney General Eric Holder, wonder where that clarity was when the addicts were black.

Do conservatives well listen when told that a lack of attention to policing issues in the past led to a groundswell of outrage in Ferguson, Missouri? Is it well understood that issues of poverty, educational segregation, and police brutality can lead to the protests, violent and peaceful, that many conservatives so decry?

It is not. Because saying that those issues cause that behavior constitutes only “excuses” for the black community, taking away their “personal responsibility.” America’s desperate search for good intentions appears to stop at what author W.E.B. Du Bois called “the problem of the twentieth century”: the color line.

This power structure ensures that when white people elect a sociopath, we end up feeling bad for themThey only did it because they were hurting. We are sure that they must have had a good reason.

But they don’t, and it’s time to stop looking for one. Because all God’s children are terrible – not just the tinted ones.

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You know who’s really unpatriotic? The president.

“It’s overwhelmingly clear that Trump has no true fidelity to country, no allegiance to the stars and stripes, and more importantly, the ideals that they represent.”

Over the weekend, President Trump took to vociferous denunciation of football players that don’t stand for the national anthem, referring to Colin Kaepernick’s 2016 protest of police brutality, racism, and inequality.

“Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners, when someone disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that son of a bitch off the field?'”

That was the President of the United States encouraging a private entity to fire someone…which may be a crime.

Beyond that, Trump’s Oath of Office included the vow that he would uphold and defend the Constitution, and by every stretch of the imagination, a moment of peaceful protest is covered squarely by that Constitution.

But this was never about the flag. Here’s the proof.

1. Trump says McCain is not a war hero

I don’t even like John McCain. The Arizona senator has recently garnered attention for killing Graham-Cassidy, the current version of Republican deathcare, and for appearing to be at least semi-vertebrate.

If this were about a flag, people would have been shocked and outraged when candidate Trump said this about a US veteran:

“He’s a war hero because he was captured. I like people that weren’t captured, ok, I hate to tell you.”

Indicating that service members that were captured are less of heroes than others is unpatriotic.

2. Trump brags at CIA wall

That quote was on my birthday, man. It really has been a rough year.

Donald Trump kicked off his presidency with a speech at the CIA that prompted three different op-eds about how bad it was in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Atlantic. The pieces from WaPo and NYT were written by former Agency members.

“It’s simply inappropriate to engage in self obsession on a spot that memorializes those who obsessed about others, and about mission, more than themselves,” former CIA acting director John McLaughlin told the New Yorker.

Trump gave his speech – which included bragging about inauguration size, attacking the media, and talking about himself on the cover of TIME magazine – at the wall at the CIA emblazoned with 117 stars, to commemorate agents that gave their lives for a country that does not remember them, often because it cannot.

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Photo Credit: KunTao Silat
Andrew Exum in the Atlantic explains:

“Below the famous anonymous stars themselves sits a book that explains the year each star was added and, sometimes, offers the name of the Agency case officer or analyst killed. Some stars—even some stars going back decades, to the height of the Cold War—do not have a name that accompanies them.”

Former CIA director John Brennan called the speech a “despicable display of self-aggrandizement in front of CIA’s Memorial Wall of Agency heroes.”

Yael Eisenstat in the New York Times noted that this was personal for her.

“My friend is represented by the 81st star on the Memorial Wall, which served as the background of Mr. Trump’s publicity stunt. He and the other 116 fallen colleagues did not put their lives on the line to serve as a sound bite for this president’s never-ending campaign stump speech.”

Using fallen heroes as a means to your braggadocious ends is unpatriotic.

3. Trump wages war on a gold star family

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Photo Credit: Disney | ABC Television Group (goo.gl/EGTtJY) License: (goo.gl/2iD7y3)
In 2016, at the Democratic National Convention, Khizr Khan gave a speech denouncing Trump’s immigration proposals, specifically targeting Muslims. He claimed that Donald Trump had “sacrificed nothing and no one.”

Khan lost his son, Humayun Khan, in Baghdad in 2004.

Conventional [and to be honest, every other type of] wisdom would say: “Let that go.” Donald Trump is hardly conventional.

“Who wrote that? Did Hillary’s script writers write it?” Trump said in interview with ABC’s George Stephanopolous. “I think I’ve made a lot of sacrifices. I work very, very hard.”

To be clear, Donald Trump thinks working very hard is equal to losing a son in combat. He continued this unseemly beef with the Khans for a week. During that time, he was sure to note that Ghazala Khan, Khizr’s wife, was awfully quiet during the speech, dog-whistling to the fact that the Khans are Muslim.

“She had nothing to say….She probably, maybe she wasn’t allowed to have anything to say. You tell me,” Trump said in that same interview with Stephanopolous. “But plenty of people have written that. She was extremely quiet, and it looked like she had nothing to say.”

So what was Ghazala Khan’s reason for being so quiet and meek at the DNC?

“And it was very nervous because I cannot see my son’s picture, and I cannot even come in the room where his pictures are. That’s why when I saw the picture at my back I couldn’t take it, and I controlled myself at that time. So, it is very hard.”

Attacking a gold star mother’s religion because seeing pictures of her dead son upsets her is unpatriotic. 

4. Trump dodges the draft

Bonespur
A small bone spur as marked by the arrow. – James Heilman, MD
On August 1, 2016, the New York Times published a piece on Trump’s draft deferments. This came at a time when Trump claimed his health was “perfection.”

Perhaps this is what Khan was referring to when speaking of Trump’s lack of sacrifice.

Over his lifetime, Trump received five draft deferments, four for college, and one for painful bone spurs. However, it’s complicated. I break it down in another post:

“Let’s take the previous example of Donald Trump’s bone spurs. On the surface, maybe it seems acceptable. Then you learn:

  • Reporters are unable to find proper documentation for the injuries.
  • The condition Trump cites is likely to be extremely painful, rarely not. It seems unlikely that a person wouldn’t remember where it was.
  • During the time he supposedly had the condition, it did not prevent him from playing football or basketball, things that people with that condition typically can’t do.
  • Donald Trump has lied about a range of topics his entire life.

Conclusion? Lie vs. lie

His [Trump’s] foggy memory around the injuries and activity while he supposedly had them would be consistent with a story of them being less severe than average, but if it were less severe than average, that doesn’t explain why he was unfit for the draft.

The records and deferment would be consistent with a story of a condition more severe than average, but if it were more severe, it wouldn’t explain why he can’t remember it clearly or why that didn’t bar him from other vigorous activities, like sports.”

Shirking your responsibilities as an American citizen is unpatriotic.

5. Trump promotes birther conspiracy against first black president

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President Barack Obama delivers remarks on immigration at Del Sol High School in Las Vegas, Nev., Nov. 21, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
One of the most quintessential features of Donald Trump as a political personality was his insistence that President Barack Obama was not born in America.

The accusation is wrong. It’s actually so wrong that it’s not even worth talking about whether or not it’s right, because it’s so, so wrong. And Donald Trump knew that at the time.

As FactCheck.org notes:

“Back in 2008, the Obama campaign had made public the official birth certificate issued by the state of Hawaii…Trump claimed in 2011 that the official “Certification of Live Birth” that Obama produced in 2008 was “not a birth certificate,” but we noted then that he was wrong.”

It’s not just that Trump was wrong, it is that he was deliberate. It was not an accident to claim that Barack Obama was of illegitimate heritage, unfit to lead this great country – it was intentional. It was not an accident that Trump was saying that the first black president had no right to be here – it was a clarion call to white supremacy.

The message hearkens back to the core principle of white supremacy, as noted by Alexander H. Stephens, the Vice President of the Confederacy in 1861:

“Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner- stone rests upon the great truth, that the negro is not equal to the white man.”

How could Barack Obama possibly be of legitimate birth? How could he possibly be as educated as he claims? How could he be equal to me? Trump decided that he couldn’t be.

When Senator John McCain was approached at a rally by a woman peddling the same conspiracist theories as Trump, he shut her down (to the consternation of his constituency) on the grounds that “he’s [Obama] a decent family man that I just happen to have disagreements with.”

It’s helpful to remember that in that birtherism, Donald Trump was not disagreeing with a policy prescription of then-President Obama. He was not protesting drone strikes or proxy wars. He was saying very clearly that Barack Obama shouldn’t be president because he doesn’t belong in this country.

And the reason he said that was because Barack Obama is black.

Channeling white supremacy against the sitting president is unpatriotic.

Where we are right now

It’s overwhelmingly clear that Trump has no true fidelity to country, no allegiance to the stars and stripes, and more importantly, the ideals that they represent.

When Steph Curry, Golden State Warriors champion, decided that he would not come to the White House, Trump took it personally, and to be honest, he probably should have. That translated into him giving that bizarre speech, and going after black athletes with a conviction that completely dwarfs the enthusiasm with which he defended the rights of neo-Nazis in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Clearly, with no less than 17 tweets and retweets, the issue is on his mind.

The Charlottsville incident left Heather Heyer dead. Americans harmed by peaceful protests at football games? None so far.

A final note on gratitude

Contrary to the president’s statements, this has never been about patriotism or the flag.

If it were, if the cause of those who support Trump was truly patriotic, they would not stand for these egregious acts of disrespect against intelligence agencies, veterans, and the First Amendment rights of the American public.

This is about white supremacy. This is about whether or not the leader of the most powerful country on earth believes in the Constitution he swore to uphold. This is about the galling fact that Trump appears to believe not that its protections extend to all Americans, but simply ones that look and believe like him.

To contrast, President Obama did not believe that, meeting even acrimony with full-throated defenses of the rights of all Americans in this nation.

The word of the moment appears to be “gratitude.”

The president, and many who support him, are demonstrating their steadfast adherence to the tenets of white supremacy – that people who are not white should just be grateful to be here. In the midst of demands for “respect” and “gratitude” , the ghostly whisper of a threat lingers:

“We could be so much worse to you. How dare you deny our charity? How dare you get uppity with us? How dare you disobey?”

Trump and his ilk believe that lie of birtherism and white supremacy, as echoed in the Texas letter of secession back in 1861:

…that in this free government all white men are and of right ought to be entitled to equal civil and political rights; that the servitude of the African race, as existing in these States, is mutually beneficial to both bond and free, and is abundantly authorized and justified by the experience of mankind, and the revealed will of the Almighty Creator, as recognized by all Christian nations.

The document continues to specify the rightful place of black people in America.

“We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.”

If it seems that there is no form of protest acceptable, it’s because of that last line. In the hive-mind of Trump, there is only one condition in which the existence of minorities in this country can be rendered beneficial or tolerable. As long as they entertain us while they box, they run, or they sing, we won’t have a problem. Because white America clearly believes that money or fame are adequate recompense for a continuing silence about justice.

But they’re not, and they never will be.

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Unpopular Opinion: Relitigating 2016 is the best, actually

“Archaeologists don’t say to themselves, ‘Welp, I guess we know everything we need to know about Pompeii. What we really need is to focus on the next volcano.’

#Election #HillaryClinton #BernieSanders #DonaldTrump

With Bernie Sanders pushing a new “Medicare for All” bill and Hillary Clinton attending a spate of events to promote her memoir of what-the-heck-was-that-we-all-just-went-through, feelings about the 2016 election have resurfaced…as if they ever went away in the first place.

The contentious election was a reminder of something we all instinctually know already: the same name doesn’t guarantee the same values. Whether it be atheists, Democrats, Christians, black people, or Americans, there is no containing the multiplicity of political attitudes present in a given group of people – even among people that all call themselves the same thing.

Specifically among Democrats, it’s said that Democrats shouldn’t be relitigating 2016, and instead should be focused on the future.

But shouldn’t they?

Relitigating in politics is called research anywhere else

Politics is peculiar in that it is a discipline directly affected by history, but not directly beholden to it.

Every four years, candidates get up in front of the country and say things that are demonstrably false about an esoteric policy provision or piece of political history, safe in the notion that you won’t remember.

How do expect to claim victory in the future without a thorough understanding of what led to your defeat? And how are we supposed to learn if our base instinct is that we don’t need to look at the past?

If things that happened 50 years ago affect the way we live today (and they do), then surely things that happened 9 months ago make some sort of impact.

Asking questions like:

  • What are some of the causes for this particular event?
  • Have similar things happened at different times?
  • Can we use this information to further our understanding?
  • Do any discernible patterns exist in the data?
  • Do they have explanatory or predictive power?

These are all good questions, and forestalling them because we seek some sense of hollow “unity” is not going to help us.

Archaeologists don’t say to themselves, “Welp, I guess we know everything we need to know about Pompeii. We need to focus on the next volcano.” They don’t do that because they understand how valuable the information you can get from that one event can be.

“Pompeii as an archaeological site is the longest continually excavated site in the world,” says Steven Ellis, a classics professor at the University of Cincinnati and the co-director of the Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia.

Maybe it’s time to politic like a scientist.

Politic like a scientist

In order to “look toward the future,” we have to know what happened. There’s a dead body in the room, we all know that. But is the first guy to come in and shout, “It was Colonel Mustard in the kitchen with a candlestick!” usually right? Not exactly.

  1. That guy isn’t Shawn Spencer, psychic and detective extraordinaire.
  2. Things are usually a bit more complicated than that.

It’s not wrong to acknowledge that there are a confluence of factors that lead to a given situation or that impact the outcome of one event.

Further, it’s widely said that Democrats are at a point at the moment where they are deciding the values of their party, what stays and what goes, doing “soul-searching” – or at least it’s suggested that they should.

And that won’t happen without looking into the past.

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