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All of the actions of God occur in the Middle East. I’m not sure why, really.

Jesus talked a lot about spending time with the misfits of society, but I’m sure that a lot more people would have appreciated some Biblical representation. And if he couldn’t personally get around to it, he could’ve made sure that the men that wrote his holy word traveled to other regions of the globe, or could’ve put them there to start with.

I can at least expect Clinton, Sanders, Trump, and Bush to come to my state at some point, and they’re just pesky, fallen humans.

I mean, let’s be serious, God can send a flood that’s global, but only represent one culture in the holy book? Furthermore, most of the other cultures in the Bible that are represented are simply evil, vicious, savage, and totally okay to destroy, according to God, leaving very few, if any, humanized examples of a culture that are not super scary and xenophobia-inspiring.

I find it incredibly interesting that the God of the entire universe, who breathes suns and stars into existence, didn’t think it might be important to document and lend legitimacy to the Inuit in Alaska, Canada, and Greenland, the aboriginals in Australia, or the Native Americans, in his book. (He also didn’t think that it was important to visit them personally.) What about the ancient Middle East convinced God that that was the moment in history in which he needed most desperately to intervene?

I find it incredibly interesting that the God of the entire universe…didn’t think it might be important to document and lend legitimacy to the Inuit in Alaska…the aboriginals in Australia, or the Native Americans in his book.

Another query would be why God doesn’t have a better idea of how the world, full of disparate people and ideas, even works. As I’m sure is not a surprise to many who read this blog, Christianity has a huge leg up due to torture, violence, oppression, slavery, and brutality. (Yeah, I’m looking at you, Christopher Columbus, ya jackass). Typically, indigenous people were forced to convert to Christianity. In the case of blacks that were brought to America, they were deprived of reading and writing skills, placed in the most abject social positions, and then had Christianity shoved down their throats.

What about the ancient Middle East convinced God that that was the moment in history in which he needed to intervene most desperately?

So even if Christianity is the truth, didn’t God know this would happen? Did he think it was a good idea to hinge the universal truth of the gospel on unverifiable events in the  Middle East centuries before the news got to the Americas? Of course they wouldn’t believe it. They were relying on hundreds of years of hearsay from total strangers. Might it not have been better if every country, or at least every region of the world had its own personal Jesus, or at least that everyone had an opportunity to see him? (He could’ve just come and turned water to wine at a time every person has a personal camera…kinda like right now…unless his magic tricks “don’t work like that.”)

And if God is supposed to be everyone’s god, why are only certain people chosen to give that message to others? Couldn’t he just as easily have skipped some bloodshed by quickly informing everyone who he was? That way, when Chris Colombo got to the Natives, everybody could be like, “Oh, you worship the magically conceived, physics-bending, prostitute-loving zombie, too?!”

All of this, at least to me, points much less to an all-knowinglovingpowerful Creator, and more to someone who’s like, “Lemme invent the most powerful thing there is…and make him on my side.”

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